USB-C has long been considered a universal standard-a single port that can charge phones, laptops, tablets, Bluetooth speakers, and even portable consoles.

But unfortunately, the future of UBS-C charging is not as simple as there are different voltage requirements, data transmission specifications and power, which complicates things.

This is why the USB 3.0 Promoter Group – which includes Apple, HP, Intel, Microsoft, Texas Instruments and others – has just announced the new USB standard – USB 3.2. It will support “multi-band operations,” which in theory will allow devices to transfer multiple streams of data at the same time.

“When we introduced USB Type-C to the market, we intended to assure that USB Type-C cables and connectors certified for SuperSpeed USB or SuperSpeed USB 10 Gbps would, as produced, support higher performance USB as newer generations of USB 3.0 were developed,” said Brad Saunders, USB 3.0 Promoter Group Chairman. “The USB 3.2 update delivers the next level of performance.”

Of course, for devices to take advantage of USB 3.2, they will need to support it. And given that USB 3.2 is not expected to be finalized by the end of this year, we will probably start seeing devices that support this standard only after a few years.

This are some of the Key characteristics of the USB 3.2:

  • Two-lane operation using existing USB Type-C™ cables
  • Continued use of existing SuperSpeed USB physical layer data rates and encoding techniques
  • Minor update to hub specification to address increased performance and assure seamless transitions between single and two-lane operation

https://i2.wp.com/gizbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/macbook-usb-c.jpg?fit=1169%2C484https://i2.wp.com/gizbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/macbook-usb-c.jpg?fit=210%2C87Michael K.TECH NEWSTechnology,USB,USB-CUSB-C has long been considered a universal standard-a single port that can charge phones, laptops, tablets, Bluetooth speakers, and even portable consoles. But unfortunately, the future of UBS-C charging is not as simple as there are different voltage requirements, data transmission specifications and power, which complicates things. This is why the...