Andy Rubin’s new Essential smartphone is greeted in the technology world with a threat of a lawsuit.

Accessory manufacturer Spigen accused the company of violating its own Essential trademark and demanding a complete shutdown of the new phone. Spigen owns the Essential brand, which covers a range of mobile accessories such as cases, chargers and headphones.

Spigen has successfully copyrighted the term ‘Essential’ last year in August, and while it just uses it for a range of battery packs, chargers, and Bluetooth headphones, the company’s copyright expands to categories like computers, accessories, and even smartphones.

The brand does not include the phones themselves, but the manufacturer believes that Andy Rubin’s Essential will most likely “confuse” consumers. Now the Android creator must respond to the accusation by June 15; Otherwise Spigen is ready to take legal action.

When Android Police contacted Essential’s spokesperson, it received the following neutral response, “Threat letters are commonplace in our sector. While its Spigen’s prerogative to make assertions, Essential believes they are without merit and will respond appropriately.”

https://i1.wp.com/gizbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/essential-phone-360-camera-module.jpg?fit=680%2C382https://i1.wp.com/gizbrain.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/essential-phone-360-camera-module.jpg?fit=190%2C150John GreenTECH NEWSAndroid,Andy Rubin,smartphone,SpigenAndy Rubin's new Essential smartphone is greeted in the technology world with a threat of a lawsuit. Accessory manufacturer Spigen accused the company of violating its own Essential trademark and demanding a complete shutdown of the new phone. Spigen owns the Essential brand, which covers a range of mobile accessories...